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On-chain Governance

At its core, on-chain governance is a group of individuals coming together to make decisions on the blockchain. POA Network aims to improve the governance process by making it more secure, efficient and most importantly transparent.

POA Network remains transparent by using US public notaries, known as validators, to govern the network. Validators make all governance decisions through exclusive Distributed Applications (DApps) and record all decisions on the POA blockchain. This process creates an effective self-governed system where changes can be made quickly and efficiently to better serve the POA Network.

Consensus

The Identity at Stake model within POA Network adds a layer of accountability in the overall consensus. Validators must be known individuals whose participation can easily be tracked and monitored. Today, many Proof of Stake models exist which reward individuals that stake a higher amount with a higher return. However, POA Network solves this issue since it's consensus model rewards its validators in an equal manner.

John LeGassic

Validators

POA Network validators are a diverse and self-governed group of individuals. They each have been entrusted in a decentralized manner to promote network health, performance and security. Validators must monitor their own nodes and the ecosystem at large to maintain optimal performance. In addition, validators must also participate in on-chain governance by creating and voting on ballots that may update the state of the blockchain. Some examples include adding/removing validators, updating block size and soft/hard forks.

Learn more about POA validators
Jim O’Regan

Validators

POA Network validators are a diverse and self-governed group of individuals. They each have been entrusted in a decentralized manner to promote network health, performance and security. Validators must monitor their own nodes and the ecosystem at large to maintain optimal performance. In addition, validators must also participate in on-chain governance by creating and voting on ballots that may update the state of the blockchain. Some examples include adding/removing validators, updating block size and soft/hard forks.

Learn more about POA validators
Rocco Mancini

Validators

POA Network validators are a diverse and self-governed group of individuals. They each have been entrusted in a decentralized manner to promote network health, performance and security. Validators must monitor their own nodes and the ecosystem at large to maintain optimal performance. In addition, validators must also participate in on-chain governance by creating and voting on ballots that may update the state of the blockchain. Some examples include adding/removing validators, updating block size and soft/hard forks.

Learn more about POA validators
Jefferson Flowers

Validators

POA Network validators are a diverse and self-governed group of individuals. They each have been entrusted in a decentralized manner to promote network health, performance and security. Validators must monitor their own nodes and the ecosystem at large to maintain optimal performance. In addition, validators must also participate in on-chain governance by creating and voting on ballots that may update the state of the blockchain. Some examples include adding/removing validators, updating block size and soft/hard forks.

Learn more about POA validators
Melanie Marsollier

Validators

POA Network validators are a diverse and self-governed group of individuals. They each have been entrusted in a decentralized manner to promote network health, performance and security. Validators must monitor their own nodes and the ecosystem at large to maintain optimal performance. In addition, validators must also participate in on-chain governance by creating and voting on ballots that may update the state of the blockchain. Some examples include adding/removing validators, updating block size and soft/hard forks.

Learn more about POA validators
Stephen Arsenault

Validators

POA Network validators are a diverse and self-governed group of individuals. They each have been entrusted in a decentralized manner to promote network health, performance and security. Validators must monitor their own nodes and the ecosystem at large to maintain optimal performance. In addition, validators must also participate in on-chain governance by creating and voting on ballots that may update the state of the blockchain. Some examples include adding/removing validators, updating block size and soft/hard forks.

Learn more about POA validators
Marat Pekker

Validators

POA Network validators are a diverse and self-governed group of individuals. They each have been entrusted in a decentralized manner to promote network health, performance and security. Validators must monitor their own nodes and the ecosystem at large to maintain optimal performance. In addition, validators must also participate in on-chain governance by creating and voting on ballots that may update the state of the blockchain. Some examples include adding/removing validators, updating block size and soft/hard forks.

Learn more about POA validators
John D.Storey

Validators

POA Network validators are a diverse and self-governed group of individuals. They each have been entrusted in a decentralized manner to promote network health, performance and security. Validators must monitor their own nodes and the ecosystem at large to maintain optimal performance. In addition, validators must also participate in on-chain governance by creating and voting on ballots that may update the state of the blockchain. Some examples include adding/removing validators, updating block size and soft/hard forks.

Learn more about POA validators
S. Vishneuski

Validators

POA Network validators are a diverse and self-governed group of individuals. They each have been entrusted in a decentralized manner to promote network health, performance and security. Validators must monitor their own nodes and the ecosystem at large to maintain optimal performance. In addition, validators must also participate in on-chain governance by creating and voting on ballots that may update the state of the blockchain. Some examples include adding/removing validators, updating block size and soft/hard forks.

Learn more about POA validators
Lillian Chan

Validators

POA Network validators are a diverse and self-governed group of individuals. They each have been entrusted in a decentralized manner to promote network health, performance and security. Validators must monitor their own nodes and the ecosystem at large to maintain optimal performance. In addition, validators must also participate in on-chain governance by creating and voting on ballots that may update the state of the blockchain. Some examples include adding/removing validators, updating block size and soft/hard forks.

Learn more about POA validators
Alexey Emelyanov

Validators

POA Network validators are a diverse and self-governed group of individuals. They each have been entrusted in a decentralized manner to promote network health, performance and security. Validators must monitor their own nodes and the ecosystem at large to maintain optimal performance. In addition, validators must also participate in on-chain governance by creating and voting on ballots that may update the state of the blockchain. Some examples include adding/removing validators, updating block size and soft/hard forks.

Learn more about POA validators
Adam Kagy

Validators

POA Network validators are a diverse and self-governed group of individuals. They each have been entrusted in a decentralized manner to promote network health, performance and security. Validators must monitor their own nodes and the ecosystem at large to maintain optimal performance. In addition, validators must also participate in on-chain governance by creating and voting on ballots that may update the state of the blockchain. Some examples include adding/removing validators, updating block size and soft/hard forks.

Learn more about POA validators
Ilmira Nugumanova

Validators

POA Network validators are a diverse and self-governed group of individuals. They each have been entrusted in a decentralized manner to promote network health, performance and security. Validators must monitor their own nodes and the ecosystem at large to maintain optimal performance. In addition, validators must also participate in on-chain governance by creating and voting on ballots that may update the state of the blockchain. Some examples include adding/removing validators, updating block size and soft/hard forks.

Learn more about POA validators
Xiaobo Chen

Validators

POA Network validators are a diverse and self-governed group of individuals. They each have been entrusted in a decentralized manner to promote network health, performance and security. Validators must monitor their own nodes and the ecosystem at large to maintain optimal performance. In addition, validators must also participate in on-chain governance by creating and voting on ballots that may update the state of the blockchain. Some examples include adding/removing validators, updating block size and soft/hard forks.

Learn more about POA validators
Transparency
The Identity at Stake model of the POA Network removes anonymity from the validation equation
Read More
POA
Transparency
The identity at Stake model of the POA Network removes anonymity from the validation equation
Read More
Notaries
Each POA Network validator is required to be a public notary within the United States in good standing Read More
POA
Notaries
Each POA Network validator is required to be a public notary within the United States in good standing Read More
Security
POA Network takes this a step further by including a set of human checks and balances in the validation cycle Read More
POA
Security
POA Network takes this a step further by including a set of human checks and balances in the validation cycle Read More
Scalability
Validators govern themselves and vote on the addition/removal of validators by exercising their voting Read More
POA
Scalability
Validators govern themselves and vote on the addition/removal of validators by exercising their voting Read More
Ballots
Validators are empowered to propose their own ballots in order to implement changes to improve the consensus
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POA
Ballots
Validators are empowered to propose their own ballots in order to implement changes to improve the consensus
Read More
Voting
Validators have a duty to vote on key decisions that can potentially alter the future state of the consensus
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POA
Voting
Validators have a duty to vote on key decisions that can potentially alter the future state of the consensus
Read More

Transparency

The Identity at Stake model of the POA Network removes anonymity from the validation equation. Validators must prove their identity and be willing to stake their reputation in order to host a decentralized node. Whereas Proof of Stake (POS) consensus requires validators to put up capital in return for rewards, Identity at Stake requires validators to risk their identity and reputation in order to validate blocks. Transparency creates personal accountability as validators know their actions and participation are written to the public ledger and available for anyone to view.

Notaries

Each POA Network validator is required to be a public notary within the United States in good standing. A public notary is considered a public official of integrity appointed by a state government. They are duty-bound to provide impartial and trusted witness to the signing of official documents. This requirement creates a standard for network validators and allows for accessible identity verification. In addition, every US state has different rules regarding notary licensing. Because Validators reside in many different states, no single state law can impact all Validators at once.

Security

Network security is paramount to any blockchain. Sound cryptography and technical infrastructure must be implemented to provide peace of mind. POA Network takes this a step further by including a set of human checks and balances in the validation cycle. Validators are incentivized to provide an up-to-date and secure node on the network. If a node is corrupted, other network validators will move quickly to remedy the situation through the on-chain governance process.

Scalability

POA Network validators prove its scalability by being able to add and/or remove other validators via ballots within the on-chain governance system. Candidates first start on the Sokol test net and must meet certain requirements before they're considered for the core network. Current core network validators have the ability to vote in a new validator via the Ballots and voting DApp. To be marked successful, a majority vote is required among all existing validators. In the same manner, validators can also be removed if they display negligence or complacency in terms of their responsibilities that come with the role.

Ballots

Validators can create on-chain ballots that propose changes to the network. Some examples of ballots can include decisions such as adding/removing validators, updating governance contracts, hard fork decisions, and much more. Ballots can be initiated through a DApp by any validator and presented to the entire group for a majority vote. Validators discuss the merits of a ballot before voting takes place. This model creates a self-governing mechanism that results in proactive governance to maintain the integrity of the overall network.

Voting

Validator participation within the voting process is vital to the overall success of the network. A majority on-chain vote in favor of a proposed ballot is required in order to proceed with a permanent change written to the blockchain. Validators monitor one another to ensure each individual is contributing to the on-chain governance process. A lack of participation in the voting process may result in a proposal to remove the non-participating individual.

Governance DApps

live
Proof of Physical Address
More Info POA
Source Code POA
soon
Proof of Bank Account
More Info POA
Source Code POA
live
Governance DApp
More Info POA
Source Code POA
live
List of Active Validators
More Info POA
Source Code POA
live
Statistics of Ballots
Source Code POA

How POA Governance Compares

5s 15s 0.5s 15-20s 4s
Trusted US Public Notary, willing to stake identity and reputation, meet specifications for server performance and emphasis on geographic diversity Not possible on Ethereum Ability to successfully produce a block. Includes crypto exchanges and mining pools Must be within the NEO ecosystem. Every validator must know every other validator Ripple validators meet specifications for server performance, networking capability, and geographic diversity
Elected by a majority vote of current validators in a decentralized manner through on-chain governance N/A Token holders select validators. More tokens possession allows for more voting power NEO’s team currently operates all validator nodes in the network Ripple company adds trusted validators nodes based on diversification of identity, location, hardware and software
21 5 21 7 70+
11 (Constantly Increasing) 3 11 1 1

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